The Deadly Effects Of Having GINGIVITIS (Gum Disease)-You Need to Check This ASAP

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People who had gingivitis often ignore the possibility that it may end their life in any moment.

Did you know that gum disease (gingivitis) isn’t just bad news for your teeth, it’s also linked to serious health problems in other parts of your body?

Gum disease also known as periodontal disease or periodontitis, may increase your risk of all kinds of other health complications, including stroke, diabetes and heart disease. Gum disease has even been linked with problems in pregnancy and dementia

It may hurt your heart

People with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease compared to those don’t have periodontitis. Researchers aren’t exactly sure of why this might be, but one theory is that harmful bacteria from your mouth enters your blood stream and attaches to fatty plaques in your heart’s blood vessels, leading to inflammation and upping your risk of clots that can trigger heart attacks.

Your memory could suffer

Some research suggests there may be a tie between poor oral health and an increased risk of dementia. Experts think oral bacteria may spread to the brain through cranial nerves that connect to the jaw or through the bloodstream, and may contribute to the type of plaque that’s been linked to Alzheimer’s.

It can hurt blood sugar

People with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than those without diabetes. While this may be because diabetics are more susceptible to infections, there’s also been research that finds gum disease could make it harder to control your blood sugar, and that treating it helps improve diabetes symptoms.

It may affect breathing

Gum disease may increase your risk of getting respiratory infections, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia. The infections might be caused when bacteria from the mouth are inhaled into your lungs, possibly causing your airways to become inflamed.

It could hurt your fertility

Women of childbearing age with gum disease took an average of just over seven months to become pregnant—two months longer than the average of five months that it took women without gum disease to conceive, discovered researchers in Western Australia. Other research finds that pregnant women with gum disease might have higher odds of miscarriage.
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